Jean Watson’s caring science and online library instruction #2

This is the second post describing how my Learning Advisor colleague, Bronwen Dickson and I used the ‘caring science’ pedagogy to provide online library instruction to nursing students.  I’m going to talk about how we provided opportunities for our students to express caring – for themselves, their student colleagues and for Bronwen and me. If you want to know how the workshops came to be and how Bronwen and I used four principles for online educators as described by the ‘cybercaring’ framework to guide the whole experience, you can find that in part #1.

Cybercaring provides learners many opportunities to demonstrate caring (See Sitzman & Watson, 2016). Invitations to care can be given via explicit instruction, by creating activities activities and resources that prompt caring behaviours, and by modelling the desired behaviours. Following is Sitzman and Watson’s (2016) list of the seven opportunities for students to demonstrate caring (pp. 68-9) and how each unfolded before, during and after the workshops. I have included pertinent student feedback as a reminder to myself and to indicate the kinds of things other facilitators of online learning might like to consider.

consistently demonstrate full presence through the creation of high-quality work and communications

Much of the workshop took place as small group (2-3 students) activities. Students worked together to solve APA referencing problems and then reported their results to the larger class. Bronwen and I visited the groups during the activities and observed the students working together to complete the work, communicating verbally and via chat to navigate resources and find answers. Production of ‘quality work’ may be a stretch for our circumstance, but we got the sense that students were giving their best attempt. Student feedback indicated that some time pressure focussed the groups however, too little time was discouraging. In response to our observations and student feedback we reduced the number of activities in later classes to allow more time for each activity.

communicate clearly, kindly and respectfully

Communication was vital for the success of the workshops. Therefore, I provided suggestions on how to introduce yourself and communicate with the group, and Bronwen and I modelled this when we introduced ourselves and responded to each other’s introduction. Students were always kind and respectful, however clarity of communication was improved when Bronwen and I explained how to use zoom effectively, including checking-in on group members without a microphone and using the chat function to include these participants. Again, we did this in response to student feedback.

reach out for help early

Bronwen and I repeatedly encouraged students to ask questions to their groups and to the larger workshop. We always responded with ‘great question…’ or similar validation.  We found that students did ask questions during the workshop and we both received emailed questions from time to time after the workshops. Again, more questions were asked when Bronwen and I responded to student feedback to wait a little longer for people to ask a question. Students let us know that it can be tricky to find the microphone button while trying to compose a question – or hold one in your head – especially for our students learning English as an additional language.

respond to messages promptly

Most students did respond to the invitation to participate in the workshop promptly and let me know which date would suit their schedule. It is not clear whether this was due to my carefully worded request, or to the workshop being a requirement for these students to progress in their course.

share personal and professional experiences to enhance learning for all

Bronwen and I invited students to share with their small group their confusion about APA referencing and/or any tips that they thought might help others. The sharing shaped the direction of the workshops, allowing Bronwen and I to spend more time on topics students found difficult and demonstrate how to use the resources effectively. Students told us that this sharing was very enjoyable – it provided relief from any belief that they were on their own in this situation. Perhaps this helped them learn.

As an aside, many students wanted more time to share. One external student even told us that this was the first time she felt really connected to other students in the course.  I think there is an invitation to us as educators here, to embed opportunities for students to connect with each other and with each other’s experiences.

pursue learning with commitment & enthusiasm, evidenced by full engagement

In the workshops students were invited to work together to solve APA problems using authoritative APA tools. Bronwen and I were able to check in with the groups to assist if required. The groups we observed did work together, sometimes with a self-nominated leader, sometimes with all participants working and chatting together at once. As mentioned earlier, students in the initial workshop told us that they would like more time to complete group activities, and so we removed one activity and modified the remaining ones to allow more time.

acknowledge shared humanity of instructor & students

In our introduction and through the workshop, Bronwen and I shared pitfalls we had experienced. We wanted to create a collaborative, problem solving approach rather than an automatic ‘run to the expert’ approach. Students may have expected to be taught by APA experts, but instead they got two human beings. Students seemed to respond well to this expression of our humanity, by listening and responding and by volunteering stories of their own. As mentioned above, the sharing seemed to create a feeling of connection to each other.

reflection on what we learned from providing students opportunities to express caring

I was initially a little concerned that using this approach – and especially the sharing -would backfire. It was not how I had ever experienced or run a library class before. I thought the students might be impatient and just want to get the class done. However, this was not the case at all. Students appreciated the sharing, they called the class inclusive, collaborative and fun.

The other interesting thing for me was the quality of the feedback the students provided, even though we used a standard feedback form. I would usually expect appreciation: ‘I liked it.’ ‘The librarian is nice.’ Or not: ‘Too long!’ ‘boring’ But these students went further, their feedback was useful and Bronwen and I were able to improve the workshop just by following the student advice. Students also told us what they liked about the class, what made it worthwhile. Students appreciated that they could use their new skills and they enjoyed the affective elements informed by caring science.

some conclusions and things I want to do in future

I want to keep using caring science in my teaching and other interactions with students and colleagues. I am currently considering how I can incorporate caring science within the online learning objects (tutorials, videos, PowerPoint slides…) I create. This is an interesting thing to consider!

I am also exploring how the library creates a sense of belonging and connection with the 70% of our students who study externally. What else are we doing that works? What else and how could we do more?

I’d be very happy to hear anyone’s thoughts on this, or any aspects of this post 🙂

Reference

Sitzman, K., & Watson, J. (2016). Watson’s caring in the digital world: A guide for caring when interacting, teaching, and learning in cyberspace. New York, NY: Springer.

Jean Watson’s caring science and online library instruction #1

This post is about how my learning advisor colleague, Bronwen Dickson and I used the ‘caring science’ pedagogy to provide online library workshops to nursing students.  I’ll describe how the workshops came to be, and how Bronwen and I used four principles for online educators as described by Watson and Sitzman’s (2016) ‘cybercaring’ framework. In a second post I will tell how the students undertaking the workshops demonstrated caring in the online environment. Continue reading “Jean Watson’s caring science and online library instruction #1”

Making connections at a library conference

Excited again.

Tomorrow I’m off to APLIC2018 —  my first library conference! There will be many things to see and do, but I’m going to focus on workshops and presentations about building engagement and collaborating with my clients to improve library services, design new ones, and evaluate whether these services are effective.

I’m also hoping to meet other librarians interested in caring, kindness, mindfulness and similar topics.

Making a difference, here I come!

A banded snail in close up. The snail appears to be looking right at the camera.

Banded snail (Cepea nemoralis). Andy MurraySome rights reserved. Flickr.

 

 

Watson’s 10 ‘Caritas’ & Caritas 1 in the library

This snail has a gorgeous brown and white pattern on its shell. It is photographed from the front but is turning to look to the left.
Crackers93. Snail. Some rights reserved. (Flickr).

Jean Watson is a nurse educator, creator of the transpersonal caring science philosophy and founder of the Watson Caring Science Institute. Central to Watson’s caring science are the Caritas: ten guidelines for the creation and maintenance of authentic, caring healing and learning environments (1).

I would love to live and work in such an environment! And so I reflect on the first Caritas:

Sustaining humanistic-altruistic values by practice of loving-kindness, compassion and equanimity with self/others (2).

I see three dimensions to this Caritas. The first dimension I see talks to values: this Caritas asks us to value each *human life we encounter for its own sake: life and individual lives are intrinsically precious. Intrinsically precious: before and beyond religion or science, life is precious because it is precious.

The second dimension of this Caritas suggests that it is possible to lose touch with this value — that it is necessary to sustain it. And ain’t that the truth! Reading the Caritas on my verandah at 6am on a Saturday morning with the weekend ahead of me and the birds singing in the garden, the preciousness and beauty of life is obvious. Helping a client find what they need for their assignment and sharing that aha! moment with them: yes, it’s there too. But I might find myself in a different situation: feeling overwhelmed by another phone call while I am already trying to answer one query, and have a last look at the reading I was supposed to do before a meeting in ten minutes. The preciousness of life is not so obvious to me in these moments.

The third dimension of the Caritas suggests we might sustain the value of life (or perhaps consciously reconnect to it) by practicing loving-kindness, and compassion, remaining calm and composed, first with self and also with others.

First with self: well, this is “my one wild and precious life” (3). Can I be kind to myself first? What would that look like? Would it look like an interruption to my habit of saying yes, sure, I will get that to you in 5 minutes. Can I instead breathe and look at my schedule and say Just a moment, I will be able to get to that this afternoon/tomorrow/when I see you on Wednesday. Would it sometimes even look like muting the phone or turning off email for a few minutes to give myself some time to do that reading/thinking/creating? It feels good to just imagine that. And I can also imagine a flow-on: being able to be fully present in conversations rather than being distracted by the things I need to get to right now, or even an hour ago. And being able to give a thoughtful, considered response that draws on all of me, not just the autopilot.

Maybe this is a good week for Cartitas 1. 🙂

*human life, or maybe all life and lives! trees, animals, rivers, the planet, the solar system, the sun, all of it.

 photo credit

Crackers93. Snail. Some rights reserved. (Flickr).

other sources

  1. Sitzman, K., & Watson, J. (2016). Watson’s caring in the digital world: A guide for caring when interacting, teaching, and learning in cyberspace. New York, NY: Springer.
  2. Watson, J. (n.d.). 10 Caritas Processes. Retrieved from https://www.watsoncaringscience.org/jean-bio/caring-science-theory/10-caritas-processes/
  3. Oliver, M. The summer day [poem]. Retrieved from https://www.loc.gov/poetry/180/133.html

 

vulnerability

This is a close-up phtograph of a slug in a field of poppies. The slug is reaching from one poppy stalk to a flower on another stalk. Theorange poppy the slug reached toward is the brightest object in the photo.
Slug. Some rights reserved by Joi (Flickr).

I’ve gotten stuck. One post into my re-imagining myself as metta-librarian: an academic librarian exploring the transpersonal, I find myself unable to press publish on my latest post. The truth is I’m scared. I’m scared people will say oh my god, what right does she have to talk about that stuff, she doesn’t own that, she doesn’t have her act together, she hasn’t been mindful once and really sometimes she is a bit of a bitch!

At least that’s what I tell myself.

So, I gingerly poked my fear with a stick, I turned it upside down to see what was underneath. And of course it was a nasty case of vulnerability! Here I am wanting to explore and share all this beautiful stuff that makes my world a better place but exposing myself to the judgement and opinions of others is so frightening.

So I found and watched this excellent Brene Brown TED talk on vulnerability. I thought, I can see being vulnerable is necessary for me to make meaningful connections with others, but I’m 49 already, I don’t want to do a year of therapy to deal with this stuff… How can I establish a feeling of safety now?

There is no deep and meaningful answer. I used humour:  I reminded myself that I have been blogging more than 15 years and my average post gets 8 views and 4 likes. Only one person I know in real life regularly reads this blog and she is my daughter. And the excellent folk who regularly like and comment on my posts have tolerated a variety of ramblings from me without complaint. *Feeling much better now, I continued: Furthermore, if and when I do get an audience of librarian-types, or transpersonal types, I will have posted heaps, got my act totally together and just generally be awesome!   That made me laugh too. Ho ho ho!

Even though I still feel a little scared, I hereby give myself permission to press ‘publish.’

*I am not being sarcastic. Introverts reaching out are always a little relieved by an underwhelming response. (According to the results of my self-case study 🙂 )

photo credit

Slug. Some rights reserved by Joi

This awesome photo of a slug being vulnerable and courageous was shared by Joi Ito on Flickr. Thanks Joi!

what is a transpersonal academic librarian?

cropped-4813730836_1f15eefcff_b-1.jpg
felina con botas. ‘Caracol en flor‘ CC BY-ND 2.0

What might I be/becoming?

My liaison librarian role has a learning/teaching focus, so the following exploration is a bit of a mash-up between the learning/teaching component of an Australian competency framework and an essay on transpersonal education…

Learning and Teaching: Academic librarians working in learning and teaching should have a strong understanding of and competence in the following:

Client relationships – building and managing relationships and partnerships with researchers, faculty, students and professionals, and communicating information and resources to a range of clients within a holistic, expansive, growthful, transformative process that involves a both/and rather than an either/or attitude; that is experiential and reflective, inclusive and integrated.

Information services – providing advice and instruction to enhance access to relevant and reliable information; knowledge of core finding tools, databases and resources at a level appropriate to the position to encourage an individual to find his or her unique, authentic nature, potentials, and voice, and to express and apply this knowledge and wisdom to the greatest possible extent, for the benefit of self and others.

Teaching and learning – knowledge of institutional curriculum to effectively embed information literacy as appropriate; knowledge of learning models and strategies, pedagogy, current educational technologies for the academic environment, and learning analytics to provide scaffolded training and skills development opportunities for clients; awareness of new developments in learning and teaching and potential for library services and programs to nurture an experiential learning that is fully and deeply lived, immediate, embodied, particular and concrete, with the potential to  provide service to a community.

Learning management system (LMS) – knowledge of the structure and the use of campus learning content management system to allow full expression of not only conventional forms of intellectual functioning, critical thinking, analysis, and synthesis but also the many forms of intelligence (emotional intelligence, spiritual intelligence, and the multiple forms of intelligences), oral dialog, pluralistic ways of knowing, and the informative and educational value of personal experience, the wisdom of the body, the great spiritual and wisdom traditions (which are really world psychologies), real philosophy, poetry, myth, story, the arts, contemplative inquiry, and all forms of creative expression.

Digital content creation – developing, creating and implementing online learning modules to facilitate exploration, expression and celebration of the embodied values, qualities, and practices key to transpersonal education. These qualities and values include appreciation of differences, appreciation of others and of the Universe at large, attention, authenticity, compassion, creativity, deeper levels of meaning, discernment, empathy, expansiveness, gratitude, insight, inspiration, intention, interconnectedness, intuition, mindfulness, self-observation, spirituality, spontaneity, and wisdom.

Literacies –  knowledge of current terminology, principles and practice relevant to sourcing, using, evaluating, creating and sharing of information in an academic and digital environment; nimble, flexible, and efficient selection and use of appropriate technologies to read, search, evaluate, organise, create, connect and communicate to develop transpersonal and knowledge practices from diverse wisdom approaches, to inspire direct knowing and insight specific to learners’ education and lives.

Ethical use of information – awareness of copyright law, contract obligations and plagiarism in the learning and teaching context to facilitate awareness of self in relationship to a larger whole and often awaken learners to a sense of wonder and awe and connection to the cosmos.

How I came to be interested in the idea of a transpersonal librarianship

Sources of this ‘found poem’

Leong, J., & Woods, S. (2017). CAVAL Competencies for Academic and Research Librarians.

Rowe, N., & Braud, W. (2013). Transpersonal education. In H. L. Friedman & G. Hartelius (Eds.), The Wiley Blackwell handbook of transpersonal psychology (pp. 666-686). Chichester, United Kingdom: John Wiley & Sons.

gratitude #9/10

for synchronicity… seemingly random events that collide in a way that allow us to make something great of them…

A few weeks ago three things happened within three days of each other.

  • Many students in my area of the university received their first marks and thus become aware of the value of academic honesty and referencing. Some of these students were not feeling too positive about study, or their abilities. I decided to provide an online referencing class though I was worried that I didn’t know how to do this effectively
  • I attended a seminar on reflective practices in nursing (1) with a library friend. The seminar drew on a nursing-specific tradition of transpersonal human care and suggested that it was possible to create a rich online learning environment that could provide opportunities for students to learn and the experience of being cared for.
  • In a meeting I heard of an academic who was successfully using a digital conferencing program to have students work in groups during her online classes. I contacted her, and she kindly explained how to do this.

The class was of course a beautiful failure. It was a failure in that I made a mistake in the discussion guide and we totally underestimated that time the groups would take to get working (due to familiarising themselves with the novel online environment). It was beautiful in that all the students happily stayed online for the full 90 minutes (yes, it’s true). They said that they enjoyed interacting with other students in a similar situation and felt more confident with referencing and using the resources. We have also received positive feedback from academic staff.

But, the great thing that was created was not really the class, it is the inspiration to offer a program of classes throughout Semester that uses the same principles to connect with our students online in a meaningful way. And to share this with other librarians at a conference next year. Need for contribution – met 🙂

The seminar

Horton-Deutsch, Sara. (14 September, 2017).  Reflective practice in an academic setting. Seminar presented at USQ Ipswich Campus.