richmond birdwing butterfly

23 years ago, we are at the edge of the Kuranda Rainforest track. Outside, there is only glare and heat and damp. The morning sun bites hard and hot. The bitumen is sticky with heat. The air is so wet that I breathe heavy from the short walk from home. And the blazing song of a million million cicadas buzz, throb, and pulse around us.

Kirra and me, we carefully ease past a cascading curtain of wait-a-while, and we enter the forest.

We enter the cool and dark and quiet.

We enter the stillness of the forest.

I pause to breathe a few breaths and to be present, here.

Kirra wriggles off my hip and runs ahead.

In the heart of this forest there’s a spot where the Kuranda creek murmurs around a large flat rock, 15 steps across: 25 steps for Kirra. There are flay dry patches of rock and little pools, rivulets, and a deep crevasse where an eel may – or may not – live.

Kirra is playing in the creek, perched on the rock, writing on the water with her stick and counting taddies.

I lie on the cool cool stone to look up at the forest giants.

The giant trees, columns and canopy shade us completely: just a few slender rays of sunlight are made visible where they illuminate a leaf, a twig, or tiny floating particles of dust.

And rising between the columns, a cloud of Richmond birdwing butterflies, green stained glass, catch and reflect that sunlight as they circle and eddy slowly in a gentle updraft.

Photo of a male richmond birdwing butterfly resting on a stick, wings open.
Bob Decker. 2012. Richmond Birdwing Butterfly. CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

 

a bird in flight

a bird in flight that leaves no trace –
the touch of knowing does not grab,
but leaves things as they are

traceless bird –
to know you,
& leave you as you are

Source

“Like a bird in flight that leaves no trace, the touch of knowing does not grab but leaves things as they are.” (p 14.).

Puhakka, Kaisa. (2000). An invitation to authentic knowing. In Tobin Hart, Peter L Nelson & Kaisa Puhakka (Eds.), Transpersonal knowing: Exploring the horizon of consciousness. (pp. 11-31). New York: NY. State University of New York Press.

our sun

1.

at the

heart of our

solar system, a

yellow dwarf star, a

hot ball of

glowing gases

2.

its

gravity

holds the

solar system

together –

keeping

everything from the

biggest planets to the

smallest particles of debris in

its

orbit

3.

the sun

orbits the

center of the

milky way galaxy,

bringing the

planets,

asteroids,

comets and

other objects

along

4.

connections and

interactions

between

the sun and

earth

drive our

seasons,

ocean currents,

weather,

climate,

radiation belts and

aurorae

5.

the sun

made

life on earth possible,

providing the

warmth and

energy that

forms the

basis of many

food chains

6.

the sun and the

rest of the

solar system

formed from a

giant, rotating cloud of

gas and

dust, a

solar nebula about

4.5

billion

years

ago

7.

our sun accounts for

99.8% of the

mass of the

entire solar system

8.

the sun will

someday

run out of

energy

9.

when

the sun

starts to die, it

will swell so

big that it

will engulf

mercury and venus and

maybe even

earth

found poem from beautiful original material retrieved from the NASA website in 2017. NASA. Sun: In depth. https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/sun/indepth